中文

BLOG

Monthly Archives: April 2016

What We’re Reading: China Soil Pollution, Food Supply Shortfalls, and Ugly Fruit

HANYUAN, CHINA -MARCH 25: A Chinese farmer pollinates a pear tree by hand on March 25, 2016 in Hanyuan County, Sichuan province, China. Heavy pesticide use on fruit trees in the area caused a severe decline in wild bee populations, and trees are now pollinated by hand in order to produce better fruit. Farmers pollinate the pear blossom individually. Hanyuan County describes itself as the 'world's pear capital', but the long-term viability of hand pollination is being challenged by rising labor costs and declining fruit yields. A recent United Nations biodiversity report warned that populations of bees, butterflies, and other pollinating species could face extinction due to habitat loss, pollution, pesticides, and climate change. It noted that animal pollination is responsible for 5-8% of global agricultural production, meaning declines pose potential risks to the world's major crops and food supply.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

Chinese farmers in Hanyuan County, Sichuan are forced to pollinate by hand following the disappearance of the area’s bees. (Huffington Post)

Every week we’ll round up the latest in Chinese food news and more.

CHINA FOOD NEWS

China plans nationwide soil pollution survey amid worries over public health and food safety. (Financial Times)

What China’s food safety challenges mean for consumers, regulators, and the global economy. (Brookings)

Despite bumper harvests, China still faces a big food supply shortfall. (China Daily)

& RELATED

Learn why soil microorganisms are so important to the health of your vegetables. (The Fern)

Beneath An Ugly Outside, Marred Fruit May Pack More Nutrition. (NPR)

Greenhouse in the sky: inside Europe’s biggest urban farm. (The Guardian)

Missed last week’s roundup? You can find all of our What We’re Reading weekly roundups here.

What We’re Reading: Organic Farming in China, Pesticide Poisoning, & Overfishing

125004_215596Every week we’ll round up the latest in Chinese food news and more.

CHINA FOOD NEWS

Watch office worker-turned-farmer Hou Xueying talk about her passion for organic farming on the outskirts of Shanghai. (Greenpeace)

Over 80 percent of China’s underground water used by farms, factories, and mostly rural households is unsafe for drinking because of pollution, says new government report. (AP)

China’s top legislator to inspect enforcement of the new food safety law in 10 provinces, municipalities, and autonomous regions between mid-April and the end of May. (China Daily Asia)

China pesticide pollution blamed as hundreds of pupils fall ill in Changzhou. (Financial Times)

Nearly half of farmers in China unwilling to move to cities. (CCTV)

& RELATED

The number of bluefin tuna in the Pacific has shrunk by 97 percent due to overfishing. (Eater)

Behold the meat vending machine that could change the local, sustainably raised meat industry. (Modern Farmer)

Jianbing, a Chinese Crepe, Migrates to Manhattan—for $8 a pop. (New York Times)

Missed last week’s roundup? You can find all of our What We’re Reading weekly roundups here.

 

Meet the new Chef of the Season: UMi Food Design

11891180_1654525514760378_4093582436250893796_n

We’re proud to introduce UMi Food Design as our new Chef of the Season at Hubindao! Founded by Phoebe Tran and Rénel Sun, UMi Food Design is as much about storytelling as it is about ethically sourced ingredients. This pair of best friends has come an impressively long way from their start as a pop-up food stand on the streets of Shanghai. Keep reading to learn more about our Chef of the Season series and UMi Food Design.

Continue reading Meet the new Chef of the Season: UMi Food Design

Hunter Gatherer’s Spring Menu Updates

lv3a3628_25819556543_o

Spring is a time for new beginnings. A few weeks ago we rolled out the first phase of our seasonal menu by introducing new options to our classic Hunter Gatherer bowl. This week, we’re taking that same fresh and colorful approach across the menu, with new vegetable sides, drinks, baked goods, and unique travel-inspired dishes from UMi Food Design. You’ll find a variety of flavors and meals to please any palate, from gluten-free and paleo diets to exotic ingredients.

Continue reading Hunter Gatherer’s Spring Menu Updates

Why a Healthy Real Food Diet Can Cause a Rumbly Stomach

26265897415_e2df9afd79_k (1)

Eating a more nutritious diet is key for optimal health. But if you’re feeling bloated or gassy after switching to more wholesome, healthful foods, don’t fret—it’s natural and perfectly healthy. Foods high in fiber help lower cholesterol, protect heart health, and even promote weight loss; however, they also make our digestive tract work a little harder. We’ll explain why you may experience some intestinal rumblings at Hunter Gatherer and what you can do to reduce the effects of bloating.

Continue reading Why a Healthy Real Food Diet Can Cause a Rumbly Stomach

Collect Real Food Points and Rewards When You Become a Hunter Gatherer Member

1

We are proud to announce that we have officially launched the Hunter Gatherer Membership Program! Starting today, you can sign up for a Hunter Gatherer membership through WeChat. Anytime you shop or dine with us* you’ll be able to earn points and unlock loyalty rewards—a win-win for both your health and your wallet.

* Membership currently valid only at Hubindao but will soon be available at Anfu Road and other locations as well

Continue reading Collect Real Food Points and Rewards When You Become a Hunter Gatherer Member

What We’re Reading: Fake Baby Formula, Inept Robot Chefs, & Sustainable Agriculture

downloadAmazing photographs of China’s food factories. In this picture: drying tea leaves at a tea company in Fujian. (Reuters)

Every week we’ll round up the latest in Chinese food news and more.

CHINA FOOD NEWS

Shanghai arrests six people over 17,000 tins of counterfeit baby formula. (South China Morning Post)

38% of Chinese consumers polled mention ‘organic’ and ‘green’ among top criteria for identifying safe food. (MckKinsey China PDF)

Interest in sustainable food production is growing in China—here are some ways to help it succeed. (China Dialogue)

As China pulls the plug on corn subsidies and stockpiling, farmers across China make the switch to soybeans, peanuts, and rice. (Reuters)

& RELATED

Robot chefs and waiters in Xiamen have been fired for incompetency. (South Morning China Post)

Smartphone giant Xiaomi wants to lead the trend in new, improved made-in-China products with a smart rice cooker that rivals Japanese models. (China Daily)

ICYMI: Calvin Trillin defends his Chinese food poem in the New Yorker. (The Guardian)

Missed last week’s roundup? You can find all of our What We’re Reading weekly roundups here.

What We’re Reading: Milk Food Safety, GM Grain, & a $700 Juice Box

phillipine bananasShenzhen destroys 35 tons of Philippine bananas due to excessive pesticide use. (GMA News)

Every week we’ll round up the latest in Chinese food news and more.

CHINA FOOD NEWS

China reassures the public that it won’t establish industrial-scale GM grain farms in the near future amid citizens’ dissenting opinions on the subject. (Global Times)

VIDEO: CEO Sun Yiping of Mengniu, one of China’s biggest milk producers and sole milk supplier to Shanghai Disney, talks about food safety. (CCTV News)

Public complaints about food and medicine increased 36.94% over the previous year in China. (Xinhua)

PODCAST: Chinese consumers are increasingly willing to spend more on healthier food and other products and services that enhance the quality of their lives. (McKinsey China)

McDonald’s plans to add over 1,000 restaurants in China over the next five years—that’s 250 restaurants per year. (Reuters)

& RELATED

How the world’s depleted fish populations could be turned around in just ten years. (National Geographic)

A $700 Juice Box for the Kitchen That Caught Silicon Valley’s Eye. (NY Times)

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken. (NPR)

Missed last week’s roundup? You can find all of our What We’re Reading weekly roundups here.

123